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Looking at Quirky | DesignNotes by Michael Surtees

Looking at Quirky

Quirky

Last week I got an email from Nikki at Quirky mentioning who they’re about. I thought they had an interesting concept for bringing products to life so I wanted to take a closer look at them. Was there something to be learned from their rapid product development cycles? Living in an agile design world myself I noticed some of those same characteristics in what they do, just more so with three dimensional products as opposed to software and sites.

Two things that I think they’re using to maximum effect is crowd sourcing and transparency. There’s a number of steps a product goes through that the public get to be a part of. There’s the product name along with vision statement, then it goes through a number of other stages: product research, industrial design, design & logo design, and tagline. While everyone isn’t a huge fan of the concept of crowd sourcing, for product feedback for them it’s quite helpful. If someone is actually interested in buying something, they’re more likely to want to give feedback. Another issue is time value. The more time someone helps out, the more money they make. Once a product goes to market they publicize how much individuals made. While the money at this point is quite minimal and wouldn’t entice me at all to throw ideas out—they’re moving in the right direction.

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