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Gathering subjective news in a relevant way | DesignNotes by Michael Surtees

Gathering subjective news in a relevant way

twitter times

News is a subjective term. What is important to one person might not be relevant to another. March Madness, Health Care Reform, local weather—one of those topics could be relevant but maybe not all of them to a reader. So when a person looks for relevant news their sources probably vary as much as what topics they want to read. Twitter gets a lot of attention these days because over the past couple of years people have been trusting those that they follow for relevant links to click on as much as a mainstream news headline.

Twitter Times takes that one step further. New to me but released last September, the service aggregates the Twitter connections of users. After signing in with my Twitter name it scrapes the links that the people that I’m following and if more than a couple people mention the same link it shows up on my Twitter Times page. To balance out some bias it also adds the number of friends of friends that posted the link to. While it’s not a perfect formula it does give a good perspective of stories that I’ll probably find interest in, since I’m following people that I’m interested in. I’m not sure how often the links refresh but it seems to recalibrate the news a couple times a day.

The typical set of information displayed is a headline, the source, a couple lines of text from the post, possibly a scraped image asociated with the post (really helpful to add interest to the info) and the names of the people that tweeted the original link. The only thing I wish was displayed along with the headline was the date when the post was published. I also wished that the design didn’t look like WSJ but as a place to quickly glance at what a lot of people that I’m following are finding interesting I think it’s a great resource. You can read more about it at The Twitter Times – a new paradigm for news consumption.

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