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Razmi Images Part 2 | DesignNotes by Michael Surtees

Razmi Images Part 2

contact sheet

I don’t think this post is going to make a lot of sense if you can’t log in to WSJ and view the A Chilling Photograph’s Hidden History article. But hopefully you’ll continue reading none the less. Aside from the content of the article, the thing that got me thinking was how the images were actually displayed both in print and online with WSJ. Anyone that has printed a contact sheet will appreciate how the paper displayed the Razmi images on newsprint. It doesn’t try to be fancy – just a simple header and footer displayed. When I went online to see more images, or in actuality the same images but on screen I was a scared at first. In the image below if you contrast the left image of digital enhancement to the scan of the original image there’s quite a difference . That’s kind of weird considering it’s the same image.

But before I go all negative on digital, the shocking moment came when I started clicking the digital images really quickly. I felt I was the photographer taking the images. The movement gaps felt quite real. Looking back at the printed version of the paper after, I don’t think a layout could ever had moved me as much as seeing the photos through the eyes of the photographer.

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